Printing and coloring on Kraft Tex

printing on kraft tex

It’s been a while since I had the chance to get out my Kraft Tex again and try something new. If you’ve never heard of Kraft Tex before then check out these previous articles and you can see how versatile it can be.  It’s often described as paper-fabric or just recently I’ve seen people calling it vegan leather too (which might be a bit of a stretch!), but pre-treat it and it can have a leather-like texture.


I’ve heard that you can print on Kraft Tex and that it’s also really good for arty projects such as painting, coloring, inks, and more. Well we don’t have an art shop here in Cayman so I was rather limited to what supplies I could find but that didn’t stop me at least giving it a try.  I’ve tried printing on fabric before and had awesome results so this seemed the ideal next project to try.

How to print on fabric at home. 4 different methods and products tested and reviewed.

I started with the Stone colored Kraft Tex and thought that would be a good compromise for printing and coloring. Not as dark as the Black or Chocolate but not bright like the white that could get grubby over time. You must have seen all of the adult coloring books and pages by now, and I admit, I love these but still haven’t actually got one for myself. The Kraft Tex project seemed like the perfect chance to do both at once so I downloaded a free adult coloring page (under the sea of course) and resized it to fit 4 x 6 inches in my print settings.

Then I cut a piece of Kraft Tex 6 x 4 inches, flattened it out with a hot dry iron, and when it was cool, just ran it through the printer. Success first time! I just gave it a little ‘tap’ as it started to feed and it went through my regular home printer no problem at all.  The picture was just printed in black but there’s no reason you couldn’t use color printing too, although then if printing in full color you might want to try the white Kraft Tex as your base.  Experiment and see how you get on.

Results for printing on Kraft Tex. The printing was good, but not so much the Sharpies!

The printing came out perfectly and I should have taken a photo but I was so delighted with it that I wanted to color it right away. So out came my ‘art supplies’ which consists of a red and a blue Sharpie – I told you I was making do with limited art supplies! I doodled a few colors on there and this is the result.  I like the look very much, although it was probably more classy without the Sharpies to be honest, just with the black line drawing.  I’ll know for next time.

Results for printing on Kraft Tex. The printing was good, but not so much the Sharpies!

Now time to give it a good scrunch and boil it up for 5 mins and see what happens.  Fingers crossed with those Sharpies…Results for printing on Kraft Tex. The printing was good, but not so much the Sharpies!But oh dear, that didn’t come out so well.  The Kraft Tex has the lovely leather effect texture I was after and all the black printing remained perfectly.  The Sharpies on the other hand, didn’t do too well and both the red and the blue ink ran and bled into the surrounds.  Now it looks all mucky and blurry.  In fairness I don’t suppose the regular Sharpies are designed to be boiled. This project gets officially tagged as a ‘failure’.

Results for printing on Kraft Tex. The printing was good, but not so much the Sharpies!

However, as an experiment I thought it went well.  The printing was easy and came out really sharp and clear so I’ll certainly be doing that again.  Now to come up with some ideas for how to use the printed Kraft Tex and look out for some new designs to use.

Probably won’t be using those Sharpies again although I hear they do make oil-based paint pens including in metallic colors such as silver, gold and bronze. I bet those would look stunning on the black Kraft Tex background if you were artistic, which sadly I am not.

Have you ever tried painting or printing on Kraft Tex yet?  Got any tips for products that work well and resist the boiling?  Let me know your tips.

Results for printing on Kraft Tex. The printing was good, but not so much the Sharpies!

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9 Responses to Printing and coloring on Kraft Tex

  1. Deborah D'Amelio says:

    I love your projects but this site is SOOO slow with all the competing ads. I realize you need to use some to pay for the site since it’s free to us. I use Chrome. Is there a better browser? Thx.

    • Mayra at So Sew Easy says:

      Hi Deborah, try clearing your browser cache. There are actually no ads on that particular page except in the sidebar. If you’re seeing any they may be from old scripts in the browser cache or something. What type of computer are you using? You may want to try Firefox as Chrome seems pretty susceptible to holding on to bad scripts.

  2. christine says:

    hi there, ive used sharpies on KT and had some great finishes……..I didn’t attempt to wash afterwards though……..I heat sealed with a dry hot iron then used bees wax over the top to waterproof the finish……..used the panels as an overlay on a handbag and they look amazing……

  3. Pingback: How to print and color on Kraft Tex - Sewing 4 Free

  4. Pamela Joy says:

    Deny! So happy to see a post by you! This (printing on Kraft Tex) fascinates me. I’ve been meaning to try the wallet, even bought the Kraft Tex, but other projects have been getting in the way. You know how that is! The first chance I get I’m going to tackle the wallet and put a cute printed design on the front! Thanks for the article!

  5. Sherry Kelly says:

    I haven’t used Kraft Tex, but why couldn’t you boil it and THEN color on it?

  6. Brenda says:

    I don’t think it was a fail. I think it just has a different look to it. Still pretty!
    Did you try setting the inks with an iron before washing? I wonder if that would help? Also could try putting a color catcher sheet in the wash.

  7. liz n. says:

    I wonder if Pigma pens would work better?

What do you think?