Easy way to apply bias tape to a v-neck tutorial

bias tape to a v-neckHave you ever wanted to apply a bias tape to a v-neck and did not know how?  This quick and easy tutorial will show you how to do this and is appropriate for woven and knit fabrics.

This kind of technique can be use when you do not want to sew a collar to your garment, making the garment lighter and easier to style –which is perfect for the warmer days of summer.


I am using calico fabric and cotton/poly bias tape for illustration purposes so you can see clearly what I am doing.  However, for better results please match the thread to the bias tape and the bias tape to the fabric.


Most patterns have a 5/8″ seam allowance, so the size of the bias tape is entirely your choice.  To keep with the pattern directions and to not alter the size of the neckline, sew a stay stitch line to 5/8″.  This will be your guideline on where to place the fold of the bias tape and it will also be a great help if you decided to make your own bias tape.  Please have a look at this tutorial for a review on how to make your own.

Start by taking the front side and stay stitch around the neckline to 5/8″.

bias tape to a v-neck Draw a line straight down the middle of the V.  This will be your cutting line.  This cut will allow the V to open so you will be able to sew the bias tape in a straight line.

bias tape to a v-neckCut the V to the point stopping 1/8″ before the stitching line.  The pins are just there to illustrate the 1/8″ measurement.  bias tape to a v-neck

If you are using a store bought bias tape, notice that one part is usually longer than the other as shown in the picture below.  Pin the shorter side of the tape to the right side of the fabric. bias tape to a v-neckPin the tape on top of the stay stitching line.

bias tape to a v-neckSew the tape and when you get to where you cut the V, straighten the fabric by pulling to the left and continue sewing.  Use the stitching line you made as a guide.bias tape to a v-neckbias tape to a v-neckContinue sewing the tape on a straight line making sure that when you pass by the the point where you made the cut (marked by the yellow arrow) you sew over the stay stitching line.

bias tape to a v-neck

Once you have finished sewing on the front side of the bias tape fold it back making sure the edge of the tape falls below the stitching line. bias tape to a v-neckSew very close to the fabric, taking special care on the point marked by the yellow arrow.  It is important to make sure you catch the tape on the back.bias tape to a v-neckTurn your work to the wrong side and fold the V-neck.  You will sew a straight line on the tape following the yellow arrow direction.

bias tape to a v-neckbias tape to a v-neckFlatten the little triangle with your iron so it lies flat.bias tape to a v-neckFront view of V-neck, remove your stay stitching line and iron the entire work. bias tape to a v-neck
As you can see, it is very easy to apply bias tape to a V-neck.  Using satin bias tape will give your top a touch of elegance and lightness.  We will be using this technique in future projects so please stay tuned!

bias tape to a v-neck

Special note for beginners

If you are using a very soft and easy to unravel fabric like silk or rayon, sew the bias tape first sew until you get to the point of the V, lift the foot of the machine, then make the cut.  Pivot the fabric, bias tape to a v-neckand continue sewing. This way you will minimize unraveling the fabric.bias tape to a v-neck


Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Easy way to apply bias tape to a v-neck tutorial

  1. Heather Hamlin-Brewer says:

    Thank you for a great tutorial. Very clear, easy to see and follow!

  2. Ione Reid says:

    After years of not catching the other side when topstitching, I decided to reverse this process. Start and stitch on the wrong side of the fabric. Turn and topstitch on the FRONT of the fabric. That way, if stitching isn’t perfect, its on the wrong side and not the right side! Hope this helps someone.

  3. Alice Crawford says:

    Why on earth did you use such a dark bias binding, it’s impossible to see the stitches because of that dark color?? If I were teaching this, I’d have used either white or yellow and then sewn with a dark thread. This tutorial is useless if it can’t be seen!

What do you think?